Monday, May 11, 2015

The Gospel According To Lucas


"There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death."--Proverbs 14:12

The Netherlands was the first country in the world to legalize sodomite "marriages" and killing innocent people via euthanasia. As far back as 1966, the so-called Dutch Catechism authored by Modernist arch-heretics Frs. Edward Schillebeeckx and Piet Schoonenberg informed people:"Openness to the (ecumenical) movement comes through prayer, through constant reform and renewal, through studying the sources of faith and each other's traditions, through readiness to abandon our well loved forms, through honest and patient dialogue, …and this openness brings with it the tranquility and joy, which is of the good Spirit."

 With all of this evil, and the millions of souls being lead to eternal damnation, one would think that the solution would lie in having recourse to prayer (especially the Rosary), the Mass, the sacraments, and an attempt to convert people with sound doctrine. Think again. There is a Vatican II sect "priest" who has realized the answer to all these ills is...Star Wars! "Fr." Roderick Vonhogen is a Vatican II sect "priest" from Amersfoort, Utrecht in the Netherlands who works as a "new media broadcaster" and television presenter of programming related to Modernism (which he calls "Catholicism") and pop culture.

According to his website fatherroderick.com: "As a priest and a life-long Star Wars fan, I have often thought about the almost universal appeal of these movies thanks to their integration of fundamental moral and religious themes. Friendship, sacrifice, fall, redemption, forgiveness, salvation: all these themes make Star Wars what it is." Mr. Vonhogen then informs us that each chapter in his book would link some event in the six (soon to be seven) movies with an event in the history of Christianity, such as the Virgin Birth of Christ. Vonhogen is certainly not the first person to think the movies of George Lucas which started in 1977 contain religious themes. Unfortunately, it does promote religion--a faith with a diabolical origin.

1. Star Wars Presents The Elements Of Religion

 Belief in "The Force" is Religious
The Jedi Knights in this "galaxy far, far away" have practices that the first movie (now with the prequels it's renumbered the fourth movie; "A New Hope") that are directly referred to as "religion" no less than three times. A character named Tarkin states to Darth Vader, "The Jedi are extinct...you, my friend, are all that's left of their religion."

The Force is an impersonal and universal energy field that permeates all things in the universe. It is neither good nor evil in itself, but it can be used for either purpose. While not omnipotent, it is the source of great power to perform feats that defy natural laws, such as gravity. All religions have an Ultimate of some kind. The Force is an omnipresent, supernatural power that surrounds all things and to which all things return. The Force is therefore the equivalent of God or a Supreme Being.

By means of the Force (always capitalized, like the word God) the Jedi disciple can perform miracles such as levitating a sunken ship, knowing when someone is nearby, guiding your physical movements, allowing you to see without using your eyes, etc. Religions have moral codes. The Jedi religion teaches you must use "the good side of the Force" and avoid "the Dark (evil) side" by getting rid of anger and hatred which lead to the Dark side.

The movies clearly portray life after death. At the end of The Empire Strikes Back, we see the deceased Ben Kenobi, Yoda, and the former Darth Vader (as Anakin Skywalker) as spirits in a state of happiness. Ben Kenobi willingly dies at the hands of Darth Vader so he can guide Luke Skywalker as he "returns to the Force." It is implied there will be an absorption and end of personal existence at some point after death.

Faith in the Force is the means of salvation. It is the source of deliverance in the universe. However, belief in absolutes is evil and "Only a sith (evil character) speaks in absolutes," says Yoda. (However, that statement is also absolute, which would make Yoda a sith too, but logic is not the strong suit of George Lucas. Even the religious benediction "May The Force Be With You" is a blasphemous deviation of "The Lord be with you."

According to George Lucas biographer Dale Pollock, "The message of Star Wars is religious: God isn't dead, he's (sic) really there if you want him (sic) to be. 'The laws really are in yourself,' Lucas is fond of saying; the Force dwells within." (See Skywalking: The Life and Films of George Lucas, NY: Ballentine Books, (1983), pg. 139)

2. The Religion of the Force is Incompatible With Christianity and Cannot Be A Christian Allegory

The Star Wars saga is based on the Eastern philosophy of pantheism, where the universe is "God." (I'll have more to say about that later in this post). Here are the striking and irreconcilable differences between the religion of Star Wars and Christianity:

a) The Force is impersonal, God is personal

b) One is a cosmic force, the Other is a loving Heavenly Father.

c) The Force is not omnipotent, God is all-powerful

d) Lucas's Force has a good and evil side, God is omni-benevolent with no taint of evil whatsoever

e) The Force is a power to be felt but not to be thought; God is a Person to be known by reason and loved with all your heart (See St. Matthew 22: 36-37)

f) The Force is an energy field permeating all things; God is a Personal being that transcends the universe he created and upholds its very existence

g) The Force is generated by all living things, but God is the Creator of all things both living and non-living

h) The Force has no consciousness; God is omniscient

i) The Force fatalistically determines the future; God controls the future, but does not negate human free will

j) Lucas tells us that after death one is absorbed into the larger Force; God has willed all people to retain their personal identity, either with Him in Heaven, or (God forbid) without Him in Hell

3. The Satanic Connection
his morning, on Star Wars Day (May 4, 2015), I had an idea for a new book. Since this is the year of the release of the first new Star Wars Movie since Revenge of the Sith, I would like to write down my thoughts about the religious elements George Lucas used in his Saga.
As a priest and a life-long Star Wars fan, I have often thought about the almost universal appeal of these movies thanks to their integration of fundamental moral and religious themes. Friendship, sacrifice, fall, redemption, forgiveness, salvation: all these themes make Star Wars what it is.
- See more at: http://www.fatherroderick.com/2015/05/04/an-idea-for-a-new-book/#sthash.XTP6oJk2.dpuf
his morning, on Star Wars Day (May 4, 2015), I had an idea for a new book. Since this is the year of the release of the first new Star Wars Movie since Revenge of the Sith, I would like to write down my thoughts about the religious elements George Lucas used in his Saga.
As a priest and a life-long Star Wars fan, I have often thought about the almost universal appeal of these movies thanks to their integration of fundamental moral and religious themes. Friendship, sacrifice, fall, redemption, forgiveness, salvation: all these themes make Star Wars what it is.
- See more at: http://www.fatherroderick.com/2015/05/04/an-idea-for-a-new-book/#sthash.XTP6oJk2.dpuf
Where did Lucas get his idea for Star Wars?  According to his aforementioned biographer, Dale Pollock, "Lucas's concept of The Force was heavily influenced by Carlos Castaneda's Tales of Power. This is an account of a Mexican Indian sorcerer, Don Juan, who uses the phrase 'life force.'" Kenneth Minogue, Professor of Political Science at the University of London states, "Castaneda's is entirely in the occultist tradition."  Lucas's biographer concludes: "Yoda's philosophy is entirely Buddhist--he tells Luke that the Force requires him to be calm, at peace, and passive; it should be used for knowledge and defense, not greed and aggression." (pg. 140) Star Wars parallels with Eastern religion and occultist views of pantheism, the view that God is everything, and everything is God. "God" is within. Pollack writes, "...when people die their life spirit is drained from them and incorporated in a huge energy force...joining the ethereal oneness of the Force." (pgs. 140 & 204)

 Our Vatican II "priest," Mr. Vonhogen, wants to peddle Eastern and occult pantheism on people as a "Christian allegory," allegedly to bring people to Christ. He seems blissfully unaware that you can't use a "Force from Hell" to accomplish this goal. People will look for Christ in a forum where, ironically, He is excluded. And what of the countless people who will get caught up in this pantheistic frenzy known as Star Wars? In the words of Han Solo, "I have a bad feeling about this."

5 comments:

  1. Someone asked me if Tolkien was promoting occult and magic too if he had elves and magic in "The Lord of the Rings"

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    1. Tolkien, a devout Catholic, described his influences in writing The Lord of The Rings. His was an allegory based on traditional theistic concepts and Catholic morality. He was very much like CS Lewis and his Chronicles of Narnia--another Christian allegory.
      Lucas, describes a decidedly pantheistic worldview based on Buddha and other pagan sources, and openly admits as much. There's your difference. It makes all the difference in the world (view).
      --Introibo

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  2. Thanks for this super post, again!
    I realised that you do a lot of research and also know where to find the right information.
    In the past days, I met a Spanish "catholic" girl here in Austria, who told me that she was here in a mission of the " new cathecumenal way"... I asked questions and did some research, but i couldn't find a good and clear definition; but I suspect that it might be a kind of sect or something that the VaticanC. 2 approved... Could you write something on this topic, please? I am really confused...
    Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for the kind words. I will do some research and try to do a post on that subject within the next 4 weeks. God Bless!
      ---Introibo

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  3. I hope a traditional catholic bishop would counsel this man to convert but to stay away from the priesthood.

    ReplyDelete