Monday, March 5, 2018

Singing For Satan---Part 8


This week I continue my once-per-month series of posts regarding an informal study I undertook in the early 1990s regarding rock and pop music. The purpose of my study (and the background to it) can be read in the first installment of August 7, 2017. If you have not read that post, I strongly encourage you to do so before reading this installment. I will only repeat here the seven (7) evil elements that pervade today's music:

1. Violence/Murder/Suicide
2. Nihilism/Despair
3. Drug and alcohol glorification
4. Adultery/ Fornication and sexual perversion
5. The occult
6. Rebellion against lawful superiors
7. Blasphemy against God, Jesus Christ in particular, and the Church

 The exposing of the bands/artists continues.


Tori Amos and the "Lilith Performers"

The 1990s spawned a new genre of music, known as "alternative" rock, or simply "alternative." It has its roots in the 1980s for those artists whose music was outside the mainstream and offered an "alternative." Ironically, by the early 1990s, alternative took the world by storm, replacing the heavy metal and hard rock bands of the previous decade at the top of the charts and becoming mainstream themselves. I couldn't help but notice that a new phenomenon was emerging within the music. While alternative bands and artists were known for their nihilistic worldview and angst-filled lyrics, there were solo female performers filled with hate and rage towards God, men, and life in general. They sought to be the antithesis of the Blessed Mother; embracing everything unholy and reveling in it with pride. 

While not as famous as most other performers, these women sold millions of records nevertheless. In the summers of 1997-1999, "The Lilith Fair" was started by singer Sarah McLachlan, to give female recording artists exclusive coverage to combat what she perceived as bias against women in the recording and radio industries. The tour grossed $16 million dollars in 1997, making it one of the most successful tours of all time. A partial list of notable participants included Tori Amos, Sheryl Crow, Natalie Merchant, Jewel, Meredith Brooks, and Joan Osborne. 

The fact the tour was named Lilith is telling about what these women represent. The name Lilith comes from the evil Jewish Talmud, and she is alleged to be Adam's first wife--made of the same earth as he. Lilith refused to be subservient to Adam, and so she left him to mate with an archangel named Samael, who tempts people to sin. They had demon-children together. The figure of Lilith is popular among Wiccans (witches) and other occultists. She is envisioned as promiscuous night demon who steals babies in the dark. Apostate Catholic turned Freemason Samael Un Weor (born Víctor Manuel Gómez Rodríguez in 1917; d. 1977), writes in his book Pistis Sophia Unveiled, that homosexuals are Lilith's "henchmen" and women who have and/or support abortion are close to her. 

In my opinion, the quintessential woman of alternative music is Tori Amos. I will give brief mention to some others. WARNING! The lyrics and interviews of these artists are extremely vile, blasphemous, and disturbing. I've censored them as much as possible.

The "Female Judas"

 Tori Amos (b. Myra Ellen Amos in 1963) was a musical prodigy, and the daughter of a Methodist minister. She began composing music at the age of three years old. She was admitted to the prestigious Peabody Institute at John Hopkins University in 1968, when only five years old--the youngest person ever admitted to the conservatory. She was expelled in 1974, at age eleven, because she liked rock music better than classical music, and didn't want to conform to the rules of the conservatory. Amos took the name "Tori" when her boyfriend at the time said she looked like a Torrey pine tree. She continued composing and playing music, and formed a 1980s pop band called Y Can't Tori Read (So named because she refused to read sheet music at the Peabody Institute). The band was a flop, releasing one eponymous album and breaking up. 

 At age 21, while playing at a bar in Los Angeles, a patron asked her for a ride home; Amos agreed, only to be brutally raped at knife-point. She later wrote a song about it entitled Me and A Gun even though the weapon was a knife. Her big break came after the failure of her pop group. She had a contract with Atlantic Records for six albums, so she completely changed course with her music and released her first solo album, entitled Little Earthquakes, which met with commercial success. It mostly dealt with her views on religion and sex.  She has had many successful albums since, and she is listed on VH1's "100 Greatest Women of Rock and Roll" list

Although  raised in a devout Protestant household, she rejected Christ for Native American pantheism (the belief that identifies "God" and the universe as "One"). She stated, "I have built my world through Native American mythology. Growing up in a strict Methodist household in Maryland, there was no room for me to explore spirituality. When I got older, I chose to look at Christianity as another myth." (See http://www.patheos.com/blogs/faithgoespop/2012/10/tori-amos-i-chose-to-look-at-christianity-as-another-myth; Emphasis mine). 

She is a strong supporter of sodomites. In an interview with Pride Source, Amos spoke of her (at that time) eleven year old daughter as follows: "She’s grown up with gay people in our life. We have people from all walks of life on our crew – gay women and gay men that we work with. She’s been brought up in it...I had a chat with her once that if she ever came home and said she was a lesbian then that’s her choice. " (See https://pridesource.com/article/49435/). 

In reference to sodomite "marriage" and Christian opposition, she said, "If anybody calls themselves a Christian, I don’t see how you can ban consenting adults. I just don’t understand how you can see yourself as Christian and have no compassion for another person’s path. It goes against the Christ-like energy and light that I was brought up with."

In her song Spark, Amos mocks God's plan and wants to be like Judas Iscariot:

She's addicted to nicotine patches
She's addicted to nicotine patches
She's afraid of the light in the dark
6:58 are you sure where my spark is here here here
She's convinced she could hold back a glacier
But she could'nt keep baby alive
Doubting if there's a woman in there somewhere here here here
You say you don't want it again and again but you don't don't really mean it
You say you don't want it this circus were in but you don't, don't really mean it, don't Really mean it
If the divine master plan is perfected
Maybe next I'll give Judas a try (Emphasis mine)

In a 1992 interview with Hot Press magazine, Amos blasphemously suggested Christ and St. Mary Magdalene had sexual relations: "I’ve nearly always believed that Jesus Christ really liked Mary Magdalene and that if he was, as he claimed to be, a whole man, He had to have sexual relations with her…I may have felt guilty at the thought of wanting to do it with Jesus but then I say why not? He was a man." (Emphasis in original).

Her song Crucify mocks both Christ (Who can't be found), and His Church which is about "guilt":

I've been looking for a savior in these dirty streets
Looking for a savior beneath these dirty sheets
I've been raising up my hands
Drive another nail in
Got enough GUILT to start 
My own religion (Emphasis in original).

In a 1998 interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Amos declared, "Yes, I do have a mission, to expose the dark side of Christianity." In the same interview, she spews forth these most vulgar and blasphemous words, "Why don’t people want to hear about God getting a b*** j** ?(disgusting reference to oral sex, censored by me--Introibo) I thought those born-again Christians would love that." (See https://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/tori-amos-secret-garden-19980625). 

Tori Amos tells who is behind her music in the song Father Lucifer, which is a description of a hallucinogenic drug trip she had in South America in which she experienced meeting the devil:

Father Lucifer
You never looked so sane
You always did prefer the drizzle to the rain
Tell me that you're still in love with that Milkmaid
How's the Lizzies
How's your Jesus Christ been hanging

Amos just doesn't hallucinate about Lucifer; she actually credits him as being the guiding force behind her songs! In a 1996 interview with Spin magazine, she said, "I wanted to marry Lucifer…I don’t consider Lucifer an evil force…I cry and feel his presence with his music. I feel like he comes and sits on my piano."

I'm sure he does, and Ms. Amos is his willing pawn. I find it more than slightly interesting that those who practice pagan religion often claim that "Lucifer" or "Satan" simply represents "nature" or "impulses" in humans, yet they attribute the actions of an intelligent being to him, e.g., "marry" and helping to compose music. What impersonal "force of nature" or "human impulse" could be the subject of such desires or cause of such things?

Sarah McLachlan

Canadian singer Sarah McLachlan (b. 1968), is the founder of the 1997-1999 Lilith Fair. Although calling herself an agnostic (and almost nothing known about her religious upbringing), MacLachlan made a statement that she recognizes pantheism (much like Amos). In a radio interview, she said, "I don’t believe that there’s a guy up there watching down upon all of us. But I do believe that the idea … how do I explain this? God is energy. God is nature. God is in us. God is everything that breathes and lives, that connects us to ourselves and each other. It probably sounds really corny."

Again, she once stated, "I don’t follow any organized religion, but I do believe in the idea of god (sic) as a verb — being love and light, and that we are part of everything as everything is part of us." (See http://www.azquotes.com/quote/1465316; See also https://aolradio.slacker.com/).

McLachlan is a rabid pro-abortionist, yet feels strongly against killing baby seals. She said, "The commercial sealing industry in Canada is perverse and sick… They club these seals as early as 12 days old, and half the time they hook them and they drag them across the ice… It’s archaic, and it’s horrible, and I want it to stop." Typical feminist/Wiccan/eco-worship nonsense: killing baby seals is horrific (it is bad) and must be banned, but murdering an innocent unborn baby by abortion is a "woman's right to choose."



The January 1998 edition of Details magazine, McLachlan told the interviewer that she acts on her sexual impulses, and in February of that same year, told US magazine, "I'm such a slut." She did a remake of the 1980s group "XTC" song Dear God; an atheistic anthem full of anti-Christian blasphemy and hatred.

Dear God, hope you get the letter and
I pray you can make it better down here
I don't mean a big reduction in the price of beer
But all the people that you made in your image
See them starving on their feet
'Cause they don't get enough to eat from God
I can't believe in you
Dear God, sorry to disturb you but
I feel that I should be heard loud and clear
We all need a big reduction in amount of tears
And all the people that you made in your image
See them fighting in the street
'Cause they can't make opinions meet about God
I can't believe in you
Did you make disease and the diamond blue?
Did you make mankind after we made you?
And the Devil too!
Dear God don't know if you noticed but
Your name is on a lot of quotes in this book
And us crazy humans wrote it, you should take a look
And all the people that you made in your image
Still believing that junk is true
Well I know it ain't, and so do you
Dear God
I can't believe in
I don't believe
I won't believe in heaven or hell
No saints, no sinners, no devil as well
No pearly gates, no thorny crown
You're always letting us humans down
The wars you bring, the babes you drown
Those lost at sea and never found
And it's the same the whole world 'round
The hurt I see helps to compound
The Father, Son and Holy Ghost
Is just somebody's unholy hoax
And if you're up there you'll perceive
That my heart's here upon my sleeve
If there's one thing I don't believe in
It's you
Dear God

Originally released in 1986 by XTC, band member Andy Partridge, who wrote the song, loved McLachlan's cover version. (She sings it with much rage in her voice). Partridge, a self-professed atheist, relates that the song was written as a letter to God by a small boy (representing him at that age). As Partridge explained in an interview with SF Gate, "As a kid, I was really... I got myself worked into such a sweat over religion. I remember that, about the age of eight or nine, one afternoon I had visions in the sky of clouds parting, and there was God on His throne, surrounded by angels, talking to me and grinning at me. I mean, if I lived in a Catholic community, I could've milked that and made myself a fortune! But, no, I think it happened because I was in such a hysterical state about religion as a child, and about the existence of God and that sort of thing. Religion is a source of a lot of problems, and if there is a God, he would hate Christianity, he would hate Islam, he would hate Buddhism, he would hate everything that's done in His name, because nobody behaves in a way that you're supposed to behave." (Emphasis mine). This is who McLachlan admires, and what she sings.

In the Details interview, McLachlan sums up her ideology: "I think that the Devil has gotten a bad rap. The Devil is the fallen angel, the one who was willing to embrace his dark side, whereas all other angels were in total denial...The Devil is more like us..."  Her song Black takes this philosophy to its logical conclusion:

As the walls are closing in
And the colors fade to black
And my eyes are falling fast and deep into me
And I follow the tracks that lead me down
And I never follow what's right (Emphasis mine).



Joan Osborne
Joan Osborne (b. 1962), is a bisexual and apostate Catholic. In an interview with Beliefnet, she was asked if she still considers herself Catholic. Her reply, "Oh, no. I definitely lapsed out of Catholicism a long time ago. I educated myself about the history of the Catholic Church and was very put off by the history of it— just the Church's involvement in so many temporal things and political things. But, I think there is something that I retained from that,. I try to have that sense of a spiritual space inside myself and try to find that in the everyday world and in the ordinary world.

The readings that I've done in Buddhism have really affected me very strongly. [I] try to keep that mindfulness of ourselves as living in a spiritual space. It doesn't have to exist inside of a church and it can be brought to our minds and to our attention at any point and any place. To say that I'm a practicing Buddhist and sit and meditate every day, it's not true. But, when I do feel the need for that kind of solace, that a religion or a spiritual tradition can bring, that is the tradition that I turn to and those are the readings and writings that I turn to." (See http://www.beliefnet.com/entertainment/music/2008/12/joan-osborne-interview.aspx?p=3).

Her one and only smash hit, One of Us, was released in March of 1995. It mocks God, and asks if you would really want to see Him if it meant believing in Jesus Christ.

If God had a name what would it be?
And would you call it to his face?
If you were faced with Him in all His glory
What would you ask if you had just one question?
And yeah, yeah, God is great
Yeah, yeah, God is good
And yeah, yeah, yeah-yeah-yeah
What if God was one of us?
Just a slob like one of us
Just a stranger on the bus
Tryin' to make his way home?
If God had a face what would it look like?
And would you want to see if, seeing meant
That you would have to believe in things like heaven
And in Jesus and the saints, and all the prophets?
And yeah, yeah, God is great
Yeah, yeah, God is good
And yeah, yeah, yeah-yeah-yeah
What if God was one of us?
Just a slob like one of us
Just a stranger on the bus
Tryin' to make his way home?
Just tryin' to make his way home
Like back up to heaven all alone
Nobody callin' on the phone
'Cept for the Pope maybe in Rome (Emphasis mine)

Well, in Osborne's wacky world, God won't be getting phone calls from Bergoglio, as he doesn't qualify for the office of pope.

Conclusion

 The crowning jewel in all of God's creation is a woman; the Immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God. Unfortunately, some women choose to go the way of the mythological Lilith, a demon representing destruction and rebellion. The alternative rock women of the 1990s represent this deviance par excellence. They are hateful and angry towards God and the world. I can understand how the horrible crime Tori Amos experienced could make her bitter. However, we all have crosses to carry. We can be like the thief who mocked Christ and asked to be taken down from his cross, or we can be like the Good Thief and ask God to lift us up instead. 

Pagan religion, occultism, and carrying venomous hatred of God is a good way to ensure you're miserable in this life, and even worse off in the next. Avoid the wicked music of these women, and pray that they may convert and use their talent for God. They think they are "liberating women" with their music when, ironically, all they do is try to keep them in the bondage of sin and away from Christ and Mary--their only hope for healing and happiness. 

23 comments:

  1. Growing up in the 90's,bi-sexual liberal anti-Christ "girls" were the norm around me.
    I was disillusioned and expecting Armageddon by the age of 18.

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    1. I feel sorry for any young man today trying to find a decent wife. The culture of lesbian/bisexualism, and anti-Christianity has swept our young women of today. These alt-rock women contributed to the breakdown of our society.

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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  2. The "alternative" rock explosion from 92-96 was the last official act of de-christianizing our Western Hemisphere.
    You're completely 200% correct in calling these women the antithesis of the Blessed Mother.
    The young men had Eddie Veddar and Green Day to guide them towards apostasy.
    The women in this article were the female guides of apostasy.
    The 90's was just as,if not more tragic than the 1960's.
    Any trapping of Traditional Christianity was gutted during that decade and abomination literally became the new normal way of life by 1999.

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  3. Great series of articles. I am more a TV show specialist and I realize that I could write dozens of articles spotting the same demonic messages as you spotted here, if I had the time to do it. As you said up there, I acknowledge as a young catholic how difficult it is to find a catholic spouse (or a catholic husband) nowadays. Few people, even in traditionnalist groups, don't realize the amount of discipline that is required to face the current state of the society. Can't wait to read your next articles !

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    1. As an old guy in his 50s, I take my hat off to the young Traditionalists of today, such as you. I married later than most because I refused to compromise the Faith. God rewarded me by bringing my wonderful wife into my life. She was more than worth the wait! The problem in the 1980s was the difficulty in meeting someone prior to computers and social media. Traditionalist Chapels And Churches were much fewer, and people came from far away. However, the culture was not nearly as bad, and it was easier to combat the temptations of the world.

      Now you have social access and more Traditionalists Churches than ever before, but the decadence has never been greater. It takes a special person to persevere in the Faith today. Keep praying for the grace you need and know you are in my prayers!

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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  4. Great article. Keep em coming.

    Jesus and Mary,
    David

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    Replies
    1. David,
      As long as my good readers let me know they profit from these music posts, I’ll keep publishing my research! Thanks for letting me know.

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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  5. Never cared for the above musician’s music or for Lilith Fair. Now I know why! Thanks for the article!!

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    1. Thanks Joann! It’s scary to think about what these musicians represent and how many people try to defend them even AFTER the truth regarding them is known. You’re not fooled or someone living in denial!

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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    2. Introibo- I am just too old to have cared much about any music of the 90’s! I have always liked music from the 50’s and before. Just curious what you think of music from that era? Thanks much!!

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    3. Joann,
      Rock music began in the mid-1950s. It was marked by (but not necessarily) rebellion and sex. The very name "rock and roll" was 1950s street lingo for sex. I believe Elvis Presley got a bad rap. His only awards for singing came from GOSPEL music! It's true that "Elvis the Pelvis" was censored for his movements on the Ed Sullivan Show. He was wrong in so doing, but still retained a sense of the sacred. A reporter once asked him, "How does it feel to be the King of Rock and Roll?" Elvis replied, "Please don't call me that. Christ is King; I'm just Elvis."

      Most songs were not perverse or overtly evil. Elvis swinging his hips seems tame beyond belief compared to the garbage lyrics and lifestyles of today. Elvis got hooked on pain meds, but wasn't proud of it or encouraged others to take drugs.

      In my opinion, the real evil in modern music began with The Beatles. It has gotten progressively worse ever since, except for Christian rock--a good listening alternative.

      God Bless,

      ---Introibo

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    4. Introibo - Thanks for the info!! Was wondering how rock and roll got its name. I also didn’t know that rock and roll started in the mid-50’s. I never liked Elvis, though my Mother did!! I should have been more specific in my post above regarding the musicians. The musicians that I like from that era are: Connie Francis, Andy Williams, Perry Como, The Glen Miller Band, etc. What is your opinion on those type of musicians?

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    5. I honestly cannot say, Joann. I have not researched them, nor do I listen to them. The basic rules of discernment apply: 1. Do they promote an evil lifestyle and 2. Do their lyrics promote ideas an actions contrary to Faith and/or morals. My hunch is that most of these singers of that era would be harmless.

      God Bless,
      —-Introibo

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    6. There is an infamous rumor Glen Miller sold his soul to Satan hence the young tragic death.
      It's been many years since I read about it so I can't remember if it's true.

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    7. Very interesting! I’ve never heard of that, but one of his best known songs is an instrumental entitled, “In the Mood,” allegedly about the mood to dance, but the title carries a double meaning and was considered risqué for the time. If you find any citations to this alleged pact with Satan, please pass it on to my readers and me!

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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  6. Thank you for a very god series of articles! Your insights do help to understand some of the chaos in the entertainment surrounding us.

    God bless you!

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    1. Thank you for the kind words my friend! I’m glad these posts help—and as long as they do, I shall continue to publish my research.

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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  7. I'm glad you wrote about that Joan Osborne song. I detest it and my husband heard a coworker singing it just to get on my husband's nerves. His co-worker is a Satanist who is always attempting to antagonize my husband. My husband walks away and goes to his truck and prays a rosary. But once he heard the guy singing that song and said "But God was one of us. He is full man and full God. He is Jesus Christ" and the guy backed away.

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    1. Rhea,
      I’m appalled by what happened to your husband at work. He should report the Satanist to HR for creating a hostile work environment. Religion is a protected class under Federal law!

      I liked his impromptu lyrics! Good for him!

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

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    2. Yeah the guys a real coocoo clock conspiracy nut whose obsessed with satanism and he tried to debunk Catholicism to my husband and constantly brings up religion
      My husband said he won't argue too much with him because the guy is a violent type. He's always saying wild stuff. Thanks to your blog we now know where he got the idea about Lilith from. He antagonizes my husband and another Catholic all the time. I will bring it up about HR but my husband isn't the type to do much. He likes to lay low.

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    3. Rhea,
      Just my two cents: A Satanist whose violent? Sounds like a headline waiting to happen. This man needs to be reported by your husband and the other gentleman to HR with concerns about their safety. He may like to lay low, but unless he can transfer elsewhere away from that disreputable person, he needs to protect himself should the guy snap.

      God Bless,

      —-Introibo

      Delete
  8. Never heard of the Lilith back story, thanks. I her up in the 90s and remember that

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